8 Ways Hackers Use the Deep and Dark Web to Steal Your Information

Deep and dark web hackers buy and sell all kinds of personal information. They sell stolen credit card numbers for as little as $9 and if the card uses a unique one-time payment code even that is available for the right price.

Credit card numbers are far from the only thing that’s at risk though. Let’s look at 9 ways hackers on the dark web steal your information.

The Deep and Dark Web Compared

There are three levels of the web:

  1. The world-wide-web that anyone can access.
  2. The deep web is made up of sites that aren’t indexed by the search engines but aren’t necessarily bad.
  3. The dark web, a subsection of the deep web, deals mainly with illegal activities.

Encryption & Anonymity

The foundation of how hackers steal your information through the dark web is encryption and anonymity. They use special software to access these sites that encrypt everything they do. Nobody uses their real name and most transactions use completely anonymous cryptocurrencies.

Carding

“Carding” is the buying and selling of credit card information. If your credit card details get stolen, they could end up for sale on the dark web for any hacker to use. Even high-tech protection like one-time purchase codes is for sale.

Botnets

Botnets are one of the most common ways hackers steal information. They take over personal computers around the world and turn them into “bots” that are all connected through the internet. These botnets are incredibly powerful because of the sheer number of machines involved.

Brute Force Attacks

Hackers may use a brute force attack to steal your information by hacking into your accounts or your PC. These attacks often use botnets to test millions of different passwords until they find one that works. This is why it’s not a good idea to use dictionary words for your password.

Malware

Viruses and other malware are another common method of stealing information. Once your computer gets infected with one of these, a hacker can easily access all your data and even track everything you type including things like your login credentials for banks and other websites.

Stolen Documents

Scanned copies of sensitive documents are often available through the dark web. Passports, citizenship documents, and other personal information can be bought by anyone with access to these sites.

Finding Your Address and Other Information

Hackers use resources on the dark web to find addresses, phone numbers, workplaces, and many other things about your “real” life. Hackers can use these to target you in other ways or as part of a larger identity theft operation.

Social Engineering

Most people picture someone in a dark room, hammering away on their computer keyboard when they think of hackers. A lot of the information hackers collect is obtained through social engineering. They’ll pretend to be someone they’re not and trick people into revealing personal information through email, over the phone, or even face-to-face.

Deep and Dark Web Hackers are Buying and Selling Information

The dark web has its own underground economy, with hackers buying and selling almost any kind of information you can imagine. They use untraceable websites and payment methods to do “business” with one another outside the view of most of the world.

If you’ve been targeted by hackers on the dark web or you want to make sure you’re protected if it happens, Core Networks can help.

Get in touch with us today to find out more about our Cyber Security service and how it can help keep you safe.

It’s Not a Nigerian Prince! How to Tell if You’re Being Scammed in 4 Simple Steps

An alarming number of Americans are scammed each year. According to the United States Senate, seniors lose nearly $3 billion per year due to scams.

Many people have heard of the Nigerian prince scam. Here, a (fake) “member of the Nigerian royal family” promises to share their fortune with you.

To get your cash, you simply need to pay a small transfer fee and provide your bank account information. Next thing you know, the scammers are emptying your bank account.

The Nigerian scam is one of many common email, online, and phone scams.

Read on to learn how to tell if you’re being scammed in four easy steps.

1. Maintain Awareness

The first step in identifying scams is being aware that they exist. You should be naturally skeptical of any attempt to give you money or other amenities.

If a proposal sounds too good to be true, it probably is. This is especially true if the source of the offer is unexpected or unknown.

2. Exercise Caution

It is important that you exercise caution when opening e-mails or accepting phone calls from unknown sources. You should not click on hyperlinks included in e-mails from unrecognized sources. This is likely a spear-phishing attempt to hack your e-mail account and extract personal information.

In addition, you should not provide any personal information. This includes banking information, social security, and your date of birth.

3. Do Some Research

One advantage of the digital era is the amount of information available on the web. Most scams can be identified by performing a simple Google search.

Conduct a search of the company’s name and see what comes up. Also, check with the Better Business Bureau (BBB) to see if the company is legitimate.

You can also perform an online search of what the company or person is offering. In many cases, you will find countless examples of victims warning you to avoid this scam.

4. Look for Warning Signs

For many scams, there are little details that are off. These are warning signs that the communication is illegitimate.

One common scam is an e-mail or phone call from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) stating that you owe back taxes. For starters, the IRS does not operate this way and would not communicate with you via phone or e-mail.

Furthermore, scammers try to make e-mails look as authentic and official as possible. Scammers may use a fake e-mail address that resembles an IRS account.

These fake accounts can be identified by subtle spelling or grammatical errors. Also, all official correspondence from a government account will come from a .gov e-mail address. Any e-mail from a .com or .org address purporting to be a government agency is likely fraudulent.

How to Tell If You’re Being Scammed: A Recap

In the digital era, scammers are everywhere and constantly seeking to acquire your personal information. The goal is to steal money from you or possibly your identity.

The best advice is to remain vigilant and protect your personal information at all costs. If you enjoyed this article about how to tell if you’re being scammed, check out our blog for more great content.