What Does Windows 7 Support End of Life Mean for Your Business?

In 2019, Help Net Security found out that 43% of businesses were still running Windows 7.

If your business is among them, it’s high time to prepare for Windows 7 end of life. From January 2020, Microsoft will no longer provide support for this system. As popular as it was, Windows 7 always had a limited lifespan.

Not sure why it’s time to move on? Here’s a quick guide to help you out.

What It Means

First things first: why is the end of Windows 7 support such a big deal?

For starters, there’s the matter of security. Once Jan. 14 rolls around, PCs running Windows 7 will face higher exposure to security risks. These include viruses, corruption, data loss, cyber-attacks, and so on.

Also, your business may be subject to regulatory compliance such as GDPR, PCI, or HIPAA. In this case, if you continue to use an unsupported operating system, your business won’t pass its yearly audits.

The Two Options

The best way to protect your IT infrastructure is to migrate to Windows 10 by the Jan. 14 deadline. You have two viable options at your disposal.

1. Upgrade to Windows 10

Are most of your business laptops and computers less than three years old? If so, your best bet is a simple upgrade to Windows 10. This won’t take a long time and allows you to keep your existing files and software.

The upgrade costs depend on whether your PCs have Windows 10 pre-loaded. If they do, you only need to buy the installation file ($120-$200 per machine). If you need to buy the license as well, you may end up spending a lot more.

Once you add the license costs into the mix, the age of your existing PCs becomes a key factor. The older a computer gets, the closer it is to the end of its life. If you’ll have to replace it soon, it may not be wise to invest in it.

2. Purchasing New PCs

Your other option is to buy PCs that come with Windows 10 installed. This is the more expensive route, as well as the more time-consuming one. Researching new PCs, transferring the files, and setting everything up can take a while.

That said, this may be the right move for two types of businesses:

• Businesses with computers that are more than three years old

• Businesses with computers that don’t have the Windows 10 OEM license

As mentioned above, the Windows 10 license and software can be steep. In these situations, businesses should look at each individual PC. If most of them don’t have licenses or are older than three years, getting new PCs makes sense.

Of course, keeping PCs that are older than three years is also a valid option. That said, keep in mind that these will keep slowing down over time. Plus, they may not be completely compatible with Windows 10.

More on Windows 7 End of Life

As you can see, you shouldn’t take the Windows 7 end of life deadline lightly. If your business has an in-house IT department, they should already be on top of it. If you have a managed service provider, check in with them.

Want to know more about the security issues that Windows 10 can protect you from? Worried that your business isn’t safe from cyber-attacks? We can help you out — contact us right here, and we’ll get back to you!

Great Ways To Avoid Falling For Email Phishing Scams And Attacks

All it takes is a single click to put all of your business’s confidential data in the wrong hands and plunge the entire company into mass chaos. Data breaches can devastate a business because of how hard it is to bounce back from them. The most popular scam that causes these sorts of breaches is email phishing.

Sometimes it can be hard to tell a fake email from a legitimate one. Hackers are getting craftier by the day. 

There are some methods that you can use to protect yourself from these vicious attacks. Check out this helpful email phishing guide. 

1. Stay Informed 

The first step to any successful action plan is to keep yourself updated and informed. Keep your eyes open for any news regarding email phishing. 

The sooner you know about these scammer’s latest methods, the less likely you are to fall into their trap. 

2. Think Before Clicking

It’s one thing to open an email from a known and trusted client without thinking about it, it’s another to open one willy nilly from a stranger. When you get an email from someone you don’t know, inspect it carefully

Hover over the links in the email to make sure that they are going to the place they say they’re going to before you click them. Check and see if the email contains your name at the beginning. If it starts with “dear customer” it’s probably a scam. 

3. Install a Toolbar 

The best way to keep your business safe is to brace yourself with the right tools. Most browsers have a security toolbar that you can download. It provides basic protection and it’s completely free. 

The toolbar runs checks for phishing websites every time you visit a site. If they find anything you will be alerted so you can get off the website ASAP. 

4. Check the Site’s Security 

Everyone is a little cautious about sharing confidential data online but as long as the website is secure you’re fine. There are ways to check and make sure that it is secure before you start typing in personal business information. 

First off, you want to be sure that the website URL starts with “https”. Second of all, you want to look at the little lock icon located beside the URL in the search bar. If the lock is closed the site is secure and if it’s open then it’s not. 

5. Keep Your Browser Up to Date 

Browsers are constantly updating themselves with security patches. These patches are released to fix loopholes that hackers found in the security system. 

So, if you’re the type of person to ignore these patches, stop. Listen to your browser and install the patch. It’s annoying because you’ll have to stop what you’re doing but it’s worth it. 

Expert Ways to Avoid Email Phishing 

Email phishing is a security scam that can be easy to fall victim to. Hackers are crafty. Sometimes the emails they send look as legit as the ones that you get from clients. 

The trick to avoiding this scam is to stay aware of the latest computer security news and keep your computer updated and protected. Don’t let your business’s information fall into the wrong hands. 

Do you think your work computer has suffered from an email phishing incident? Contact us for immediate assistance.

The Top Cyber Security Risks And How You Can Avoid Them

Did you realize over 58 percent of the cyber attacks perpetrated each year target small businesses? For most businesses, using the power of technology to stay connected with consumers and other businesses is a must. Making sure the network you have in place is secure should be one of your top concerns.

Ignoring the need for better network security measures can lead to big problems in the long run. This is why learning about cyber security risks and the measures needed to mitigate these risks is vital. Informing yourself and your team about these online dangers can help you keep sensitive information out of the hands of hackers.

Read below to find out more about common cyber security threats and how to avoid them.

Ransomware Attacks are Surprisingly Common

Keeping sensitive information on your servers is probably something you do without much thought. One of the worst things that can happen to a business owner is becoming the victim of a ransomware attack.

This attack involves hackers taking control of a business network and demanding a ransom to release the information contained on it. Paying this ransom will only make your problems worse, which is why taking measures to prevent these attacks altogether is important.

The best way to mitigate the risks posed by ransomware attacks is by putting a backup and recovery system in place. A cloud-based system will backup your data immediately. With this backup, you can wipe your network clean and remove ransomware with ease.

Phishing Scams Can Create Lots of Problems

You and your employees probably receive hundreds of emails on a monthly basis. The worst mistake you can make when receiving an email from an unknown address is to open any attachments. Cyber-criminals use email phishing scams to put viruses on a network or to steal sensitive login credentials.

Not only will you need to bulk up your network security to fend off these attacks, you also need to work on educating your team about phishing scams. The more they know about what to look for when receiving emails, the easier it will be to avoid these scams.

Avoid Establishing a Bring Your Own Device Policy

Saving money is one of the main concerns most business owners have. While staying on budget is important, you need to avoid making decisions based on cost alone. When it comes to allowing employees to bring in their own devices to access sensitive information, you need to avoid this at all costs.

Most smartphones and other mobile devices are not secure. This means that the sensitive information accessed on these devices can be stolen by a cyber-criminal.

By providing your employees with devices, you can rest assured they are secure.

Professionals Can Help You Avoid Cyber Security Risks

If you are unsure about how to avoid common cyber security risks, working with professionals is a good idea. Without this professional guidance, you are bound to make mistakes.

Are you looking for an experienced managed IT provider? If so, contact us now to find out about the services we provide.

8 Ways Hackers Use the Deep and Dark Web to Steal Your Information

Deep and dark web hackers buy and sell all kinds of personal information. They sell stolen credit card numbers for as little as $9 and if the card uses a unique one-time payment code even that is available for the right price.

Credit card numbers are far from the only thing that’s at risk though. Let’s look at 9 ways hackers on the dark web steal your information.

The Deep and Dark Web Compared

There are three levels of the web:

  1. The world-wide-web that anyone can access.
  2. The deep web is made up of sites that aren’t indexed by the search engines but aren’t necessarily bad.
  3. The dark web, a subsection of the deep web, deals mainly with illegal activities.

Encryption & Anonymity

The foundation of how hackers steal your information through the dark web is encryption and anonymity. They use special software to access these sites that encrypt everything they do. Nobody uses their real name and most transactions use completely anonymous cryptocurrencies.

Carding

“Carding” is the buying and selling of credit card information. If your credit card details get stolen, they could end up for sale on the dark web for any hacker to use. Even high-tech protection like one-time purchase codes is for sale.

Botnets

Botnets are one of the most common ways hackers steal information. They take over personal computers around the world and turn them into “bots” that are all connected through the internet. These botnets are incredibly powerful because of the sheer number of machines involved.

Brute Force Attacks

Hackers may use a brute force attack to steal your information by hacking into your accounts or your PC. These attacks often use botnets to test millions of different passwords until they find one that works. This is why it’s not a good idea to use dictionary words for your password.

Malware

Viruses and other malware are another common method of stealing information. Once your computer gets infected with one of these, a hacker can easily access all your data and even track everything you type including things like your login credentials for banks and other websites.

Stolen Documents

Scanned copies of sensitive documents are often available through the dark web. Passports, citizenship documents, and other personal information can be bought by anyone with access to these sites.

Finding Your Address and Other Information

Hackers use resources on the dark web to find addresses, phone numbers, workplaces, and many other things about your “real” life. Hackers can use these to target you in other ways or as part of a larger identity theft operation.

Social Engineering

Most people picture someone in a dark room, hammering away on their computer keyboard when they think of hackers. A lot of the information hackers collect is obtained through social engineering. They’ll pretend to be someone they’re not and trick people into revealing personal information through email, over the phone, or even face-to-face.

Deep and Dark Web Hackers are Buying and Selling Information

The dark web has its own underground economy, with hackers buying and selling almost any kind of information you can imagine. They use untraceable websites and payment methods to do “business” with one another outside the view of most of the world.

If you’ve been targeted by hackers on the dark web or you want to make sure you’re protected if it happens, Core Networks can help.

Get in touch with us today to find out more about our Cyber Security service and how it can help keep you safe.

It’s Not a Nigerian Prince! How to Tell if You’re Being Scammed in 4 Simple Steps

An alarming number of Americans are scammed each year. According to the United States Senate, seniors lose nearly $3 billion per year due to scams.

Many people have heard of the Nigerian prince scam. Here, a (fake) “member of the Nigerian royal family” promises to share their fortune with you.

To get your cash, you simply need to pay a small transfer fee and provide your bank account information. Next thing you know, the scammers are emptying your bank account.

The Nigerian scam is one of many common email, online, and phone scams.

Read on to learn how to tell if you’re being scammed in four easy steps.

1. Maintain Awareness

The first step in identifying scams is being aware that they exist. You should be naturally skeptical of any attempt to give you money or other amenities.

If a proposal sounds too good to be true, it probably is. This is especially true if the source of the offer is unexpected or unknown.

2. Exercise Caution

It is important that you exercise caution when opening e-mails or accepting phone calls from unknown sources. You should not click on hyperlinks included in e-mails from unrecognized sources. This is likely a spear-phishing attempt to hack your e-mail account and extract personal information.

In addition, you should not provide any personal information. This includes banking information, social security, and your date of birth.

3. Do Some Research

One advantage of the digital era is the amount of information available on the web. Most scams can be identified by performing a simple Google search.

Conduct a search of the company’s name and see what comes up. Also, check with the Better Business Bureau (BBB) to see if the company is legitimate.

You can also perform an online search of what the company or person is offering. In many cases, you will find countless examples of victims warning you to avoid this scam.

4. Look for Warning Signs

For many scams, there are little details that are off. These are warning signs that the communication is illegitimate.

One common scam is an e-mail or phone call from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) stating that you owe back taxes. For starters, the IRS does not operate this way and would not communicate with you via phone or e-mail.

Furthermore, scammers try to make e-mails look as authentic and official as possible. Scammers may use a fake e-mail address that resembles an IRS account.

These fake accounts can be identified by subtle spelling or grammatical errors. Also, all official correspondence from a government account will come from a .gov e-mail address. Any e-mail from a .com or .org address purporting to be a government agency is likely fraudulent.

How to Tell If You’re Being Scammed: A Recap

In the digital era, scammers are everywhere and constantly seeking to acquire your personal information. The goal is to steal money from you or possibly your identity.

The best advice is to remain vigilant and protect your personal information at all costs. If you enjoyed this article about how to tell if you’re being scammed, check out our blog for more great content.