Windows 10 Simplified: 5 Tips for Businesses Switching From Windows 7

Starting back in January 2020, Windows 7 will no longer receive security updates, software updates, or technical support.

Now you’re probably wondering what this means for your business and if Windows 7 is still safe to use. 

Windows 7 still works, but without security updates and access to technical support, your organization is more susceptible to security breaches so continued use is not advised.  

An unsupported network can be troublesome for the security and efficiency of your organization. So, the next logical step for your business is transitioning to a newer software—Windows 10. 

Keep reading for a snapshot of Windows 10 simplified with 5 tips your business can implement now.

Windows 10 Simplified 

Here are our 5 tips to make your transition to Windows 10 a little easier. 

1. Make a Transition Plan

Making a transition plan is the most important way to ensure new software updates actually happen within your business. 

The longer you wait to transition from Windows 7 to Windows 10, the longer you’re putting your business’s data and privacy at risk. 

Studies show that companies that do not regularly update their software are 80% more susceptible to data breaches. 

This may seem like a tedious job, but if your computers are relatively new, updating to Windows 10 won’t be too hard.

2. Train Your Employees 

Let’s face it—people don’t like change, and moving from Windows 7 to Windows 10 is no exception. 

This is why creating a training plan within the first few weeks of your Windows 10 update is so important. 

You may be thinking that taking time out of the workday to train staff is a waste, but the effort you put into training now will pay off with less frustration and complications in the future.   

Microsft knows the importance of training staff and has lots of helpful training tools on their website

3. Consider Updating Your Hardware

If your computer is over 3 years old or close to being replaced, buying new PCs for your office may be beneficial, as they already come with Windows 10 installed. 

Buying new PCs will let you bypass the installation and licensing fees that come with updating an older computer model. 

This is especially recommended if you have an older computer that is at the end of its life—you don’t want to purchase the installation file and license just to replace the entire computer.  

4. Consider an IT Audit 

IT audits asses all your devices and determine if they are well protected and properly managed.  

An IT audit can help you get the most out of your devices by improving their usability, making sure old-technology is updated, and new-technology is reviewed for risks. Now that it’s time to update your devices to Windows 10, consider conducting an IT audit to ensure that your business is running securely and efficiently.   

5. Focus on Cybersecurity 

The “Zero Trust” model is a popular model for ensuring the cybersecurity of your business. This is an operating system that works under the assumption that you can’t trust anyone when it comes to cybersecurity, even people within the office.

This type of security model works well to secure your business’s data by verifying every person or device before granting them access to your network. Implementing a new security system can help protect your business during the transition from Windows 7 to Windows 10.  

We’re Here to Help 

We know that transitioning from Windows 7 to Windows 10 is a lot of work, but we’re here to help you through it. 

Contact us to find out more about what we do, and how we can help you and your business thrive.  

What Does Windows 7 Support End of Life Mean for Your Business?

In 2019, Help Net Security found out that 43% of businesses were still running Windows 7.

If your business is among them, it’s high time to prepare for Windows 7 end of life. From January 2020, Microsoft will no longer provide support for this system. As popular as it was, Windows 7 always had a limited lifespan.

Not sure why it’s time to move on? Here’s a quick guide to help you out.

What It Means

First things first: why is the end of Windows 7 support such a big deal?

For starters, there’s the matter of security. Once Jan. 14 rolls around, PCs running Windows 7 will face higher exposure to security risks. These include viruses, corruption, data loss, cyber-attacks, and so on.

Also, your business may be subject to regulatory compliance such as GDPR, PCI, or HIPAA. In this case, if you continue to use an unsupported operating system, your business won’t pass its yearly audits.

The Two Options

The best way to protect your IT infrastructure is to migrate to Windows 10 by the Jan. 14 deadline. You have two viable options at your disposal.

1. Upgrade to Windows 10

Are most of your business laptops and computers less than three years old? If so, your best bet is a simple upgrade to Windows 10. This won’t take a long time and allows you to keep your existing files and software.

The upgrade costs depend on whether your PCs have Windows 10 pre-loaded. If they do, you only need to buy the installation file ($120-$200 per machine). If you need to buy the license as well, you may end up spending a lot more.

Once you add the license costs into the mix, the age of your existing PCs becomes a key factor. The older a computer gets, the closer it is to the end of its life. If you’ll have to replace it soon, it may not be wise to invest in it.

2. Purchasing New PCs

Your other option is to buy PCs that come with Windows 10 installed. This is the more expensive route, as well as the more time-consuming one. Researching new PCs, transferring the files, and setting everything up can take a while.

That said, this may be the right move for two types of businesses:

• Businesses with computers that are more than three years old

• Businesses with computers that don’t have the Windows 10 OEM license

As mentioned above, the Windows 10 license and software can be steep. In these situations, businesses should look at each individual PC. If most of them don’t have licenses or are older than three years, getting new PCs makes sense.

Of course, keeping PCs that are older than three years is also a valid option. That said, keep in mind that these will keep slowing down over time. Plus, they may not be completely compatible with Windows 10.

More on Windows 7 End of Life

As you can see, you shouldn’t take the Windows 7 end of life deadline lightly. If your business has an in-house IT department, they should already be on top of it. If you have a managed service provider, check in with them.

Want to know more about the security issues that Windows 10 can protect you from? Worried that your business isn’t safe from cyber-attacks? We can help you out — contact us right here, and we’ll get back to you!